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SALMONID RICKSETTSIA SEPTICAEMIA (RICKETTSIAL SALMON SYNDROME

SALMONIDAE

SALMONIDS

SALT TOLERANCE TEST

SALTWATER MYXOBACTERIOSIS

SALVELINID

SAMPLE

SAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS

SAMPLERS

SAMPLING

SAMPLING METHOD

SANITATION

SAPONIFICATION

SAPONIN

SAPROLEGNIA

SAPROLEGNIASIS

SARCOMA

SATIATION RATION

SATURATED FATTY ACID

SATUROMETER

SCALE

SCALLOP

SCHIZONT

SCOLIOSIS

SCREEN

SCREENING

SCUTE

SEA BASS

SEA BREAM (Sparus spp.)

SEA LOUSE

SEA TROUT

SEA URCHIN

SEASONALITY

SEAWATER SYSTEM

SEAWATER, ARTIFICIAL

SEAWATER, ENRICHED

SEAWATER, NATURAL

SECCHI DISK

SECONDARY INFECTION

SECONDARY LAMELLA

SECRETION

SECTION

SEDIMENT

SEDIMENTABLE SOLIDS

SEDIMENTARY POND

SEDIMENTATION POND (SETTLING BASIN)

SEED

SEGMENTATION

SELECTIVE BREEDING

SELF-CLEANING TANK

SELF-FEEDER

SEMI-INTENSIVE CULTURE

SENSE ORGAN

SEPTIC

SEPTICAEMIA

SEROSA

SEROUS

SERRANIDAE

SERUM

SETTLEABLE SOLIDS

SETTLEMENT

SETTLING CHAMBER

SETTLING TANK

SEWAGE FUNGUS

SEX INVERSION

SEX RATIO

SEX REVERSAL

SEXUAL MATURITY

SEXUAL REPRODUCTION

SHEDDER

SHELF LIFE

SHELL DISEASE SYNDROME

SHELLFISH

SHELLFISH POISONING

SHELLFISH TOXINS

SHOCK TREATMENT

SHOCKING

SHRIMP

SHUCK

SIDE EFFECT

SIGN

SILO

SILO CULTURE

SILURIDAE

SINGLE CELL PROTEIN (Recombinant protein/ fusion protein)

SINGLE SEX CULTURE

SINGLE YEAR CLASS SITE

SINUS

SIPHON

SLAUGHTER

SLOUGH

SMOLTIFICATION

SODIUM (Na)

SOLE

SOLVENT

SOMATIC CELLS

SOMATIC GROWTH

SOMATOTROPIN

SOUTHERN BLOT

SPARGE

SPARID

SPAT

SPAT-FALL

SPAWNING

SPAWNING BEHAVIOUR

SPAWNING MIGRATION

SPAWNING POND

SPECIFIC GROWTH RATE

SPECIFICITY

SPECTROPHOTOMETER

SPERM

SPERM MOTILITY

SPERMATOGENESIS

SPERMATOPHORE

SPINNING DISEASE

SPINULE

SPLEEN

SPLEENIC

SPORE

SPOROCYST

SPOROZOA

SPORULATION

SPRING VIRAEMIA OF CARP

STABILIZATION POND

STAGE MICROMETER

STAIN

STAND PIPE

STANDARD (WATER QUALITY)

STANDARD METABOLIC RATE

STARCH

STARCH GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

STARVATION (FASTING TIME)

STATOCYST

STEADY FLOW RATE

STEATOSIS

STENOHALINE

STENOHOSPITALIC

STENOTYPIC

STERILE

STERILIZATION

STEROID

STIMULUS

STOCKING

STOCKING DENSITY

STOCKING RATE

STOMACH

STOMATITIS

STR

STRAIGHT-HINGE LARVAE

STRAIN

STRAND, NON-CODING

STREPTOCOCCAL SEPTICAEMIA

STREPTOMYCTES

STRESS

STRESSOR

STRING CULTURE

STRINGENCY

STRIPPING

STURGEON

SUBACUTE

SUBCUTANEOUS

SUBLETHAL

SUBMUCOSA

SUBTERMINAL

SUBUNIT VACCINE

SUCROSE

SUCTORIA

SUFFOCATION

SUGAR

SULFAMERIZENE

SULPHONAMIDE

SULPHONAMIDES

SUMMER KILL

SUN BURN

SUNFISH

SUPERSATURATION

SUPPLEMENTAL DIET

SUPPRESSOR T CELL

SUPRAMAXILLARY

SURVIVAL RATE

SUSPENDED CULTURE

SUSPENDED SOLIDS

SUSPENSION FEEDER

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

SUSTAINABLE USE

SWAB

SWELLING

SWIM-UP FRY

SWIMBLADDER

SWIMMERETS

SYMBIOSIS

SYMPTOM

SYNDROME

SYNTHESIS

SYSTEMIC

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d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

m

n

o

p

q

r

s

t

u

v

w

x

y

z

BATCH CULTURE

Definition

A form of culture in which a given volume of liquid medium is inoculated with cells (e.g. bacteria,unicellular algae) capable of growth in that medium, and the inoculated medium is incubated for an appropriate period of time. Cells growing under these conditions are exposed to a continually changing environment caused by the gradual consumption of nutrients and the accumulation of metabolic wastes, among other factors. The growth curve obtained by monitoring a batch culture commonly exhibits a sequence of four main phases of growth. In the lag phase, the growth rate (the rate of increase in cell numbers or biomass) is initially minimal but subsequently rises to a value dictated by the prevailing conditions (e.g., temperature, concentration of nutrients, etc.). The length of the lag phase is influenced by the cultural history of the cells in the inoculum. For example, if slowly dividing cells from a nutrient-poor environment are transferred to a nutrient-rich medium which can support a higher rate of growth, there is usually a relatively long lag phase during which time the cells become adapted to the new environment; during this period of adaptation the cells exhibit unbalanced growth. Subsequently, growth occurs at a new, higher rate permitted by the higher levels of nutrients. At the end of the lag phase, the cells enter the exponential (= logarithmic or log ) phase of growth in which, for a given organism, the growth rate is both constant and maximal for the particular growth conditions. In this phase there is an exponential increase in cell numbers and biomass; this type of growth is referred to as balanced growth. In the stationary phase the growth rate declines and eventually reaches zero. In the death phase the number of viable cells in the culture (maximal in the stationary phase) declines.

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