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Number of Results: 114

MACROPHAGE

MACROPHAGOUS

MACROPHYTE

MAGNESIUM (Mg)

MAINTENANCE RATION

MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX (MHC)

MALACHITE GREEN

MALIGNANT

MALNUTRITION

MALPIGMENTATION

MANDIBLES

MANGANESE (Mn)

MANNITOL

MARICULTURE

MARTEILIA REFRINGENS

MASCULINIZATION

MASS CULTURE

MASS SELECTION

MATURATION

MAXILLA

MAXIMUM RATION

MECHANICAL FILTRATION

MEDIAN EFFECTIVE DOSE

MEDIAN EFFECTIVE TIME

MEDICATED FEED

MEDICATION

MEDIUM

MEDULLA

MEDULLA OBLONGATA

MELANIN

MELANISM

MELANOCYTE

MELANOMA

MELANOPHORE

MELANOSIS

MELATONIN

MESENTERY

MESOCOSM

MESOHALINE

MESONEPHROS

MESOZOA

METABOLIC RATE

METABOLISM

METABOLIZABLE ENERGY (ME)

METACERCARIA

METANAUPLIUS

METASTASIS

METHANE

METHIONINE

METHYLENE BLUE

MICROBIAL RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS

MICROENCAPSULATION

MICROPYLE

MICROSATELLITE

MICROSPORIDIAN

MICROTAG

MICROTOME

MINERAL

MINERALIZATION

MINISATELLITE

MIRACIDIUM

MITOCHONDRIAL DNA

MIXED CULTURE

MOIST FEED

MOISTURE EQUIVALENT

MOLLUSCS

MONITORING

MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

MONOCULTURE

MONOCYTE

MONOGENEA

MONOGENETIC

MONOGENETIC TREMATODE

MONOPHAGOUS

MONOSEX CULTURE

MONOTROPHIC

MONOUNSATURATED FATTY ACID

MONOZYGOTIC

MORBIDITY

MORIBUND

MORTALITY

MORTALITY RATE

MOULD

MOULT

MOULT DEATH SYNDROME

MOULTING

MS 222

MUCIN

MUCOSA

MUCUS

MULTI-PORT DIFFUSER

MULTICELLULAR

MUSCLE

MUSCULATURE

MUSSEL

MUTATION

MUTATION (GENETIC)

MYCELIUM

MYCOBACTERIOSIS

MYCOBACTERIUM

MYCOPLASMA SPP.

MYCOSIS

MYOCARDITIS

MYOFIBRILS

MYOMERE

MYOPATHY

MYOSEPTA

MYOSITIS

MYTICOLA INTESTINALIS

MYXOBOLUS

MYXOMA

MYXOSOMA

MYXOSOMIASIS

MYXOSPORIDEA

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MICROBIAL RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS

Definition

Resistance to a given antibiotic ('drug resistance'} is said to be constitutive (= intrinsic ) in cells which lack the specific target site(s) of the antibiotic and/or which are inherently impermeable to the antibiotic. A cell may acquire heritable resistance to antibiotic(s) in several ways. For example, the target site of a given antibiotic may be modified as a result of a chromosomal mutation, so that it functions more or less normally in the presence of otherwise inhibitory concentrations of that antibiotic (see e.g. streptomycin). A single mutant (resistant) cell in a population of susceptible cells can therefore grow and give rise to a population of resistant cells in the presence of the given antibiotic; in bacteria, chromosomal gene(s) specifying antibiotic resistance may be transferred to antibiotic-sensitive cells by conjugation, transduction or transformation. Resistance due to a single mutation is commonly effective against only one type of antibiotic - or against those antibiotics which share the target site. Alternatively, resistance to antibiotic(s) may result from the acquisition of an R plasmid); the acquisition of such a genetic element may confer on a cell resistance to a single antibiotic (and often to related antibiotics) or resistance to two or more unrelated antibiotics; modification of the target site (e.g. MLS antibiotics); an antibiotic-effluxing system (e.g. tetracyclines); or acquisition of an antibiotic-insensitive target enzyme (e.g. folic acid antagonist). If a metabolic pathway is blocked by antibiotic activity, a cell may become insensitive to that antibiotic if it receives a supply of products of the blocked pathway.

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