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Number of Results: 128

C

C.O.D.

CADMIUM

CALCITE

CALCIUM

CALCIUM OXIDE

CALIBRATION

CALIGUS ELONGATUS

CALIGUS FLEXISPINA

CANCER

CANNIBALISM

CANNULA

CANNULATION

CANTHAXANTHIN

CAPILLARY

CAPILLARY ACTION

CARBOHYDRATE

CARBON CYCLE

CARBON DIOXIDE (CO<sub>2</sub>)

CARBON FILTER

CARBONATE

CARCINOGENIC

CARCINOMA

CARDIAC MYOPATHY SYNDROME

CARDIAC PUNCTURE

CARNIVOROUS

CAROFUR

CAROTENOIDS

CARRAGEENIN

CARRIER

CARRIER STATE

CARTILAGE

CARTILAGINOUS FISH

CASCADE

CATABOLISM

CATALYST

CATARACT

CATECHOLAMINE

CATHETER

CATHETERIZATION

CAUDAL PEDUNCLE

CAULIFLOWER DISEASE

CAUSATIVE AGENT

CAUSE-SPECIFIC MORTALITY RATE

CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE

CENTRIFUGE

CERCARIUM

CEROID

CESTODA

CHANNEL CATFISH VIRUS DISEASE (CCVD)

CHELA

CHELIPED

CHEMICAL FILTRATION

CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND (COD)

CHEMOTHERAPY

CHILODONELLA

CHITIN

CHLAMYS

CHLORAMINES

CHLORAMPHENICOL

CHLORINATION

CHLORINE

CHLOROPHYLL

CHLORTETRACYCLINE

CHOLANGITIS

CHOLESTEROL

CHOLINE

CHROMAFFIN TISSUE

CHROMATOPHORES

CHROMATOSIS

CHRONIC

CHRONIC INFECTION

CIRRHOSIS

CLAM

CLEANER FISHES

CLEAR WATER METHOD

CLEARANCE TIME

CLINICAL

CLINICAL INFECTION

CLOSED (-CYCLE) SYSTEM

CLOTTING FACTOR

COAGULATION

COBALT

COCCIDIA

COCCIDOSIS

CODE OF PRACTICE

COLDWATER DISEASE

COLDWATER VIBRIOSIS

COLUMNARIS DISEASE

COMBUSTION

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE

COMPETITION

CONCENTRATION

CONCENTRATION RESPONSE CURVE

CONGENITAL

CONGESTION

CONSUMER

CONTAGIOUS DISEASE

CONTAGIOUSNESS

CONTAINMENT

CONTROL

COPEPODS

COPPER (Cu)

CORNEA

CORPUSCLE

CORPUSCLES OF STANNIUS

CORTISOL

COSTIASIS

COTTON WOOL DISEASE

COUNTERSTAIN

CRAB

CRASSOSTREA

CRAYFISH

CRITICAL THERMAL MAXIMUM (CTM)

CROSS INFECTION

CRUSTACEANS

CRYPTOCOTYLE

CTENOPHARYNGODON IDELLA

CULTCH

CUPPED OYSTER (Crassostrea )

CYANOBACTERIA

CYANOHAEMOGLOBIN

CYPRINIDS

CYST

CYTOPATHIC

CYTOPATHOLOGY

CYTOPLASM

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BATCH CULTURE

Definition

A form of culture in which a given volume of liquid medium is inoculated with cells (e.g. bacteria,unicellular algae) capable of growth in that medium, and the inoculated medium is incubated for an appropriate period of time. Cells growing under these conditions are exposed to a continually changing environment caused by the gradual consumption of nutrients and the accumulation of metabolic wastes, among other factors. The growth curve obtained by monitoring a batch culture commonly exhibits a sequence of four main phases of growth. In the lag phase, the growth rate (the rate of increase in cell numbers or biomass) is initially minimal but subsequently rises to a value dictated by the prevailing conditions (e.g., temperature, concentration of nutrients, etc.). The length of the lag phase is influenced by the cultural history of the cells in the inoculum. For example, if slowly dividing cells from a nutrient-poor environment are transferred to a nutrient-rich medium which can support a higher rate of growth, there is usually a relatively long lag phase during which time the cells become adapted to the new environment; during this period of adaptation the cells exhibit unbalanced growth. Subsequently, growth occurs at a new, higher rate permitted by the higher levels of nutrients. At the end of the lag phase, the cells enter the exponential (= logarithmic or log ) phase of growth in which, for a given organism, the growth rate is both constant and maximal for the particular growth conditions. In this phase there is an exponential increase in cell numbers and biomass; this type of growth is referred to as balanced growth. In the stationary phase the growth rate declines and eventually reaches zero. In the death phase the number of viable cells in the culture (maximal in the stationary phase) declines.

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